Cahokian Eclipse

In late 2014, St Louis looked forward to the once in a lifetime sunset eclipse. Capturing the Arch and Sun in the same image involved finding an elevated position along a very narrow azimuth several miles away in order to keep the sun the same size as the Gateway Arch. Fortunately, 1,600 years ago, an unknown native American people built the largest and most complex archaeological site north of Mexico City. Today, historians call these earthworks, the Cahokia Mounds…a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
As the occulting moon covered the setting sun, heavy clouds obscured the celestial event. Undeterred, a small group of worshipers continued their chants and beating drums thereby carving out a fleeting window for this incredible view. The orange hues arise from the solar filter on the end of my 400mm lens.

Categories & Keywords
Category:Architecture and Structures
Subcategory:Places of Interest
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:Archaeology, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Astonishing, Astronomy, Cahokia Mounds, Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, Chants, Clouds, Collinsville IL, Dream, Dreamlike, Earthworks, Ephemeral, Epic, Ethereal, Extraordinary, Feeling & Mood, Gateway Arch, Grand, History, Illinois, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, Landscape Photography, Majestic, Meteorology, Mississippi River, Missouri, Monks Mound, Photography, Scenic, Senses, Skylines, Solar Eclipse, Solar Photography, Spectacular, Spiritual, St Louis, St Louis Arch, St Louis Skyline, St. Clair Co., Striking, Stunning Views, Stupendous, Sun, Sunset, Sunspot, Sunspot Region 2192, Surreal, UNESCO World Heritage Site, United States, View, Vista, Weighted Catenary Arch, Wondrous, an ethereal world created through the poetic imagination or rela, lasting a very short time, short-lived, transitory

Cahokian Eclipse