Art of Frozen Time Blog

by Jeffrey M. Smith

 

Friends and Followers, I'm glad you're here!   I use my blog a little differently; this is where I formally release my newest images.  

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I'm not into high-pressure sales (as annoying as pop-ups).  For me, before someone purchases an art piece, they want to know more about the print.  My newsletter will share this additional insight: talking about the location, how I photographed the scene, and what else was taking place off-camera.     

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Visitors can manually navigate to a print via one of two pull-down menus: LOCATIONS or SUBJECTS, however, I have keyworded each print, making the SEARCH BAR (upper right of page) another convenient method.  Try Dayton Skyline, or Piqua, or Hamilton, or Gateway Arch.  

Panorama of the Dayton Skyline where the heavily clouded sky caught warm colorful light appearing as skyfireSurprise Sunset Over Dayton Skyline No. 2This spectacular sunset occurred Labor Day weekend over Dayton Ohio. This stunning light took the skies over the Miami Valley only 5 minutes after the first dull grey image I released with this image. I was standing with a visiting couple from Indianapolis exploring our RiverScape MetroPark. I remember explaining that although this scene looks questionable, sometimes really incredible things happen when the setting sun finds clear skies and illuminates the clouds from underneath. This sunset started with a hint of red, right before the entire sky ignited as if were a scene from Ron Howard’s Backdraft. As the skyfire expanded horizon to horizon I elected to pursue a panoramic approach where it required 70 separate images to capture this spectacle.

Fire Wall, Miami Valley Firefighters EMS Memorial No. 7

Firewall and the Miami Valley Firefighter/EMS Memorial Association

Within Centerville Ohio’s Leonard E. Stubbs Memorial Park lies this sculpture by Jon Barlow Hudson called “Firewall”.  The memorial was commissioned by the Miami Valley Firefighter/EMS Memorial Association and honors firefighters and EMS personnel who died in the line of duty protecting citizens of the Greater Dayton area.  The sculpture’s use of empty space between the main structure and firefighter silhouette gives the sense they still watch over us from another realm.  Today, on the 20th Anniversary of 11 September, it seems appropriate to share this image as the memorial basks in the morning light.
A sculpture honoring Miami Valley Firefighters called Firewall lies in Stubbs Park, Centerville Ohio basks in the golden morning lightFire Wall, Miami Valley Firefighters EMS Memorial No. 7Within Centerville Ohio’s Leonard E. Stubbs Memorial Park lies this sculpture by Jon Barlow Hudson called “Firewall”. The monument was commissioned by the Miami Valley Firefighter/EMS Memorial Association and honors firefighters and EMS personnel who died in the line of duty protecting citizens of the Greater Dayton area. The sculpture’s use of empty space between the main structure and firefighter silhouette gives the sense they still watch over us from another realm. Today, on the 20th Anniversary of 11 September, it seems appropriate to share this image as the monument basks in the morning light.

If you are interested in this print, just click on it.  I also have two galleries that may interest you, “Centerville Ohio Parks and Architecture” and “Centerville Ohio Sculptures”.

 


Grayhead Coneflower Sunset No. 8

Sunset Over Bellbrook Ohio's Morris Reserve

In 2019, Morris Reserve (Bellbrook Sugarcreek Park District) displayed acres of grayhead coneflowers that bloomed near Bellbrook Ohio and within Sugarcreek Township.  In the Spring of 2019, the Miami Valley experienced one of the wettest seasons on record with the adjacent Little Miami River flooding its banks many times.  In this image, the sun's rays mimicked the petals of this aster family flower.
Morris Reserve near Bellbrook Ohio enjoys a super bloom of greyhead coneflowers during this summer sunsetGrayhead Coneflower at Sunset No. 8In 2019, Morris Reserve (Bellbrook Sugarcreek Park District) displayed acres of grayhead coneflowers that bloomed near Bellbrook Ohio. In the Spring of 2019, the Miami Valley experienced one of the wettest seasons on record with the adjacent Little Miami River flooding its banks many times. In this image, the sun's rays mimicked the petals of this aster family flower.

If you’d like to purchase this print or see others from Morris Reserve, check out my Bellbrook Gallery of Prints.  If you are an art consultant seeking nature images featuring flowering prairies under big skies, check out my gallery of meadows.
 

 


Art on the Lawn Best in Show Award

Art on the Lawn (Yellow Springs Ohio)

14 Aug 2021

Starting at dawn, my daughter and I sweated for 3 hours in setting up for Art on the Lawn (Yellow Springs OH) which hosted 100 other really impressive artists.  As it was our third show ever, we felt the steep learning curve as we barely made the set-up deadline.  Still, the crowds were friendly and the staff very cheerful.  That afternoon we experienced another surprise… our booth had won the BEST IN SHOW Award for excellence in craft and performance!

Photographer Jeff Smith wins Art on the Lawn 2021 Best in Show AwardArt on the Lawn 2021 Best in Show AwardPhotographer Jeff Smith (Art of Frozen Time) wins Best in Show Award at the 2021 Art on the Lawn, Yellow Springs Ohio for excellence in craft and performance

I’m forever grateful to Kaitlyn Smith and my wife Teressa for their patient help, and the awesome support of the Art on the Lawn Team.  With these honors comes an invitation for next year’s Art on the Lawn! 

 


Sedona Moonrise Over Cathedral Rock

Sedona Arizona Cathedral Rock Moonrise

12 Aug 2021 Update:  This print is on display at the 75th Annual Juried Members’ Exhibition (Springfield Ohio Museum of Art) until 3 Oct 2021.  

A magical moonrise over Sedona Arizona featuring a spire that rises between the buttes.  The formation is known as Cathedral Rock, which also serves as one of Sedona’s energy vortex sites.  As visitors explore this point of interest, many perceive a concentration of mystical energy which promotes enhanced meditation, healing, and creativity.  The subtle light and dark patches in the sky are anticrepuscular rays that spanned the sky over Red Rock Country converging on the eastern horizon.  Minutes before, large western horizon clouds blocked the light, until the sinking sun found clear air thereby painting the red Schnebly Hill Sandstone in warm light. 

A full moon rising over Sedona’s Cathedral Rock where the setting sun paints the red sandstone in warm light creating a magical sceneSedona Moonrise Over Cathedral RockA magical moonrise over Sedona Arizona featuring a spire which rises between the buttes. The formation is known as Cathedral Rock, which also serves as one of Sedona’s energy vortex sites. As visitors explore this point of interest, many perceive a concentration of mystical energy which promotes enhanced meditation, healing, and creativity. The subtle light and dark patches in the sky are anticrepuscular rays which spanned the sky over Red Rock Country converging on the eastern horizon. Minutes before, large western horizon clouds blocked the light, until the sinking sun found clear air thereby painting the red Schnebly Hill Sandstone in warm light.

This is one of several prints I’m releasing as part of my Sedona Arizona gallery.  If you’d like to purchase this print or see more Sedona scenes, check out this gallery

 

 


Solar Eclipse at Sunrise No. 2

Solar Eclipse during a Foggy Sunrise over an Ohio Farm

This partial solar eclipse proved quite the blessing as the moon covered a small portion of the sun during sunrise over Ohio skies.  For me, departing into the darkness, I was saddened to discover a cloud-filled morning twilight...but I pressed onward.  Fortunately, at sunrise, the clouds thinned for ten minutes before one of the heaviest fogs of the year rolled through the Miami Valley.  In these few moments, and amid the still and damp air, I enjoyed this enchanting sunrise over an Ohio farm. 
 

The sunlight from a partial solar eclipse at sunrise is filtered by an oncoming fog creating a brief but intriguing sceneSolar Eclipse at Sunrise No. 2This partial solar eclipse proved quite the blessing as the moon covered a small portion of the sun during sunrise over Ohio skies. For me, departing into the darkness, I was saddened to discover a cloud-filled morning twilight. Fortunately, at sunrise, the clouds thinned for ten minutes before one of the heaviest fogs of the year rolled through the Miami Valley. In these few moments, and amid the still and damp air, I enjoyed this enchanting scene.

This print is on display at the Middletown Arts Center as part of their 2021 Photography & Digital Art Competition.  The exhibit runs from 26 July to 26 August 2021.  If you'd like to see purchase this print just double click on it.  If you'd like to see additional prints from Cedarville Ohio, check out this gallery.  
 


Pearl's Fen Fennel and the Polished Ladybug No. 5

Macrophotography From Pearl's Fen, Fairborn Ohio

The Beaver Creek Wetlands Association continues its collaboration with Greene County Ohio Parks and Trails on many parks such as Pearl’s Fen, near Fairborn, Ohio.  In highlighting the wonders of its newest park, the B-W Greeenway subsequently teamed up with the Fairborn Art Association for an art exhibit featuring works that draw inspiration from this special wetland.  This is one such art print entails a polished ladybug (Cycloneda munda) which methodically explored every flower cluster of this fennel plant (Foeniculum vulgare) called umbels. 

A macro view of a polished ladybug hanging from the yellow flower cluster of a fennel plantPearl's Fen Fennel and the Polished Ladybug No. 6The Beaver Creek Wetlands Association continues adding properties to its land trust such as Pearl’s Fen, near Fairborn, Ohio. In highlighting the wonders of its newest park, the B-W Greeenway teamed up with the Fairborn Art Association for an art exhibit featuring works which draw inspiration from this wetland. I submitted this print of a polished ladybug (Cycloneda munda) which I watched methodically explore every flower cluster of this fennel plant (Foeniculum vulgare) called an umbel.

A framed version of this print is on display at the Fairborn Art Association until 25 July 2021.  If you'd like to see more prints of pollinators, check out this gallery of bees and butterflies.  

 


Golden Hour Over Oakwood Ohio Daffodils

An Oakwood Ohio home adorned with Daffodils at Sunset

Golden Hour Over Oakwood Ohio Daffodils No. 4Golden Hour Over Oakwood Ohio Daffodils No. 4Each spring, many in the Miami Valley make their way to the home of John and MJ Gray to experience their wonderful creation. In 2006, they started planting Daffodil bulbs among the hills and trees in front of their beautiful home, with each year adding 10,000 new bulbs. Reportedly, the bulbs now number 160,000. On this evening, during the magical golden hour, I tried to pay homage to their vision through this 63-image panoramic image just as the sun descended below the hills of Oakwood Ohio.

Each spring, many in the Miami Valley make their way to Oakwood Ohio and the home of John and MJ Gray to experience their wonderful creation.  In 2006, they started planting Daffodil bulbs among the hills and trees in front of their beautiful home, adding 10,000 new bulbs each year.  Reportedly, the bulbs now number 160,000.  On this evening, during the magical golden hour, I tried to capture to their vision through this 63-image panoramic image just as the sun descended below the hills of Oakwood Ohio.

Golden Hour Over Oakwood Ohio Daffodils No. 2Golden Hour Over Oakwood Ohio Daffodils No. 2Each spring, many in the Miami Valley make their way to the home of John and MJ Gray to experience their wonderful creation. In 2006, they started planting Daffodil bulbs among the hills and trees in front of their beautiful home, with each year adding 10,000 new bulbs. Reportedly, the bulbs now number 160,000. On this evening, during the magical golden hour, I tried to pay homage to their vision through this 63-image panoramic image just as the sun descended below the hills of Oakwood Ohio.

If you'd like to see this image closer, just double-click on it.  If you'd like to see other amazing images of this part of Dayton, check out my Oakwood Ohio Gallery.  


Slot Canyons of the Escalante

A photo journey of Dry Fork Slot Canyon, Peek-a-boo Gulch, and Spooky Gulch.

Utah offers visitors incredible views from vistas which extend for miles; however, the geomorphology of the state also holds incredible visual wonders for those willing to hike into canyons.  The views entail closer sightlines but exploring Utah’s Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument slot canyons offer hikers a visual wonder to those willing to commit to an all-day hike of the Coyote Gulch area. Slot canyons involve deep and sheer rock walls which possess a depth-to-width ratio of about 10:1.

To access the slot canyons, one must endure the Hole-in-the-Rock trail.  For me, it was the harshest wash-board road that I’ve ever experienced.  It was so tough, I’m surprised I did not lose a dental filling.  The “road” runs southeast from Escalante, Utah and if your 4-wheel drive vehicle sustains the 26 miles of abuse, you’ll pass the Lower Dry Fork Trailhead. 

Hiking from the trailhead into the canyon gives visitors access to three remote slot canyons:  Dry Fork Slot Canyon, Peek-a-Boo Gulch, and Spooky Gulch.  Research also indicated this order also captured their increased level of difficulty, which is how I experienced the geologic features. 

 

Geology of the Slot Canyons

To understand the geology of these slot canyons, one needs to envision back 200 million years ago when the region was characterized as a large area of red sand dunes.  The occasional weather event sorted the iron-rich sand grains into layers of varying thickness and hardness.  Eventually, more rocks formed over these features until 80 million years ago, the western portion of the US experienced a geologic uplift forming the Colorado Plateau.  As the rock layers were pushed upwards, their surfaces formed cracks and fissures that became suspectable to erosion from flash floods exposing, exposing the former sands, now called the Navajo Sandstone.

 

Most of the carving occurs during torrential monsoons that pour water over the area.  Following a thunderstorm, even those miles away, the landscape consolidates and compresses the rainwater as the growing surge descends down through a series of elevation changes.  After all, the water is trying to be somewhere else.  Under these strong forces, even rock layers can be worn down by boulders and silt gushing through the narrow confines of slot canyons.  After these periodic erosion events, the subsequent concave cuts and serpentine sluices form complex channels.  Under the mid-day sun, these geologic features reveal intricate textures as the sunlight rakes across the contrasting and complexly shaped canyon walls. 

 

Dry Fork Slot Canyon

Regardless of which slot canyon serving as your destination, the two-mile path is the same where one walks along the canyon rim until eventually descending into the floor of the canyon.  The Dry Fork Narrows was deemed the easier of the group, so I proceeded westward along the bottom and entered a wide vertical walled canyon which eventually narrowed into the sandstone layer.  I enjoyed the Dry Fork Slot Canyon as the surface gap was wide, allowing the sunlight to pour across the sinuous erosional features and fanciful rock cuts.  I explored the mile-long slot canyon to its logical end and then retraced my steps eastward.

Dry Folk Slot Canyon No. 11Dry Folk Slot Canyon No. 11The Coyote Gulch lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument along Hole-in-the-Rock Road as water flows to the Escalante River. The subsequent erosion has cut three slot canyons in the dark red Navajo Sandstone: Dry Fork Gulch, Peekaboo Gulch and Spooky Gulch. This gallery presents a series of prints from these undulating and whimsical geologic features where the resulting flowing shapes play with light and shadows in interesting ways.

Dry Folk Slot Canyon No. 18Dry Folk Slot Canyon No. 18The Coyote Gulch lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument along Hole-in-the-Rock Road as water flows to the Escalante River. The subsequent erosion has cut three slot canyons in the dark red Navajo Sandstone: Dry Fork Gulch, Peekaboo Gulch and Spooky Gulch. This gallery presents a series of prints from these undulating and whimsical geologic features where the resulting flowing shapes play with light and shadows in interesting ways. Literature on the next two slot canyons highlights they need to be explored in specific directions with hikers starting at the mouth of Peek-a-Boo and walking northward thru the canyon, upon exiting the top of the slot, proceed overland to the top of the Spooky Slot Canyon and proceed down thru its narrow cuts. 

 

Peek-a-Boo Gulch

Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon No. 2Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon No. 2Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon gains its beauty from erosion which cut into the dark red Navajo Sandstone. Although the trail becomes a tight squeeze, its shallower depth allows more light to enter the slot canyon where the random geologic features play with the light and shadows in fanciful ways.

I had read about two particular challenges pertaining to the Peek-a-Boo slot canyon.  First was its 15-foot climb into the feature.  The footholds and handholds were questionable, but enough that I could pull myself through.  Peek-a-Boo offered explorers a series of arches which felt more like orifices as one moved northward.  The now mid-day sun painted the canyon wall in amazing light where the raking sunlight revealed the intricacies of texture in the orange sandstone layers.  I’m not a small guy, but I was able to successfully pass through the narrow 11-inch squeeze once I rolled my camera bag off my shoulders. 

Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon No. 4Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon No. 4Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Peek-a-Boo Slot Canyon gains its beauty from erosion which cut into the dark red Navajo Sandstone. Although the trail becomes a tight squeeze, its shallower depth allows more light to enter the slot canyon where the random geologic features play with the light and shadows in fanciful ways.

Spooky Gulch

Although I enjoyed all three slot canyons for various reasons, Spooky Gulch was the most colorful.  I sensed the canyon walls were deeper and the top of the slot was definitely narrower.  All combined, the light did not reach the canyon's bottom, which I’m sure plays into its name, Spooky Gulch or the Eerie Slot Canyon.

Spooky Slot Canyon No. 5Spooky Slot Canyon No. 5Spooky Slot Canyon lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Spooky Slot Canyon has a narrower opening and runs deeper into the Navajo Sandstone which reduces the light entering the canyon which produces interesting tones in the dark red sandstone. In addition to the darker lighting, this canyon presents hikers with an even tighter squeeze and uncertainty to those with claustrophobic tendencies, leading to its name, Spook Gulch.

The Spooky Slot Canyon already had my full attention as research highlighted that a large boulder midway down the gulch created a challenge where one is forced to slide under the rock wedge or scale the top of the obstacle and then in a controlled fall, slide downward by pressing again both sides of the canyon wall to slow one’s descent. 

 

The second challenge entailed its even narrower slot at only 10 inches wide.  In my first three attempts, I could not squeeze thru this obstacle.  I remember assessing that reaching the distant daylight top by climbing vertically was a feat beyond my skillset, as was climbing back over the rock wedge that I had just passed.  As the Navajo Sandstone pressed against my back and stomach, I needed to focus on my breathing as I began to realize the pickle I had worked myself into.  I remain grateful to the college students I had followed into the squeeze.  To fit through, I had passed my camera bag through the narrow gap and the gentlemen holding my bag suggested I squat in the slot.  Although attempting a squat when sandwiched flat seemed like an impossible task…much to my relief, it worked! 

Spooky Slot Canyon No. 10Spooky Slot Canyon No. 10Spooky Slot Canyon lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Spooky Slot Canyon has a narrower opening and runs deeper into the Navajo Sandstone which reduces the light entering the canyon which produces interesting tones in the dark red sandstone. In addition to the darker lighting, this canyon presents hikers with an even tighter squeeze and uncertainty to those with claustrophobic tendencies, leading to its name, Spook Gulch. Spooky Slot Canyon No. 15Spooky Slot Canyon No. 15Spooky Slot Canyon lies in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Spooky Slot Canyon has a narrower opening and runs deeper into the Navajo Sandstone which reduces the light entering the canyon which produces interesting tones in the dark red sandstone. In addition to the darker lighting, this canyon presents hikers with an even tighter squeeze and uncertainty to those with claustrophobic tendencies, leading to its name, Spook Gulch.

 

This is one of several prints I’m releasing as part of my Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument gallery.  If you’d like to purchase this print or see more Utah National Park scenes, check out this gallery

 


Piqua Ohio Linear Park

Panoramic View of the Piqua Ohio Skyline

In 2001, the City of Piqua Ohio opened a new park called Linear Park.  Park designers converted an old railroad bed to a bike path and with it connected Piqua to the Great Miami River Trail and 330 miles of the Miami Valley Trail System.  On this perfect early summer evening, this panoramic scene captures a history of transportation through Piqua: with the Great Miami River gracefully bending around the city, Lock Nine Park to the far left, then railroads, and today, a massive trail network which joins one of the largest in the US.
Golden Hour Over Linear Park Bridge No. 1Golden Hour Over Linear Park Bridge No. 1In 2001 the City of Piqua Ohio opened a new park called Linear Park. Park designers converted an old railroad bed to a bike path and with it connected Piqua to the Great Miami River Trail and 330 miles of the Miami Valley Trail System. On this perfect early summer evening, this panoramic scene captures a history of transportation through Piqua: with the Great Miami River gracefully bending around the city, to Lock Nine Park to the far left, then railroads and today, a massive trail network which is one of the largest in the US.

If you'd like to purchase this print, just click on it.  If you want to see more views like this, check out this gallery of Piqua Ohio Parks.  There are more Piqua views in the master gallery of Piqua sights.  


Kettering Song and Dance Sculpture after a Spring Snow No. 2

Song and Dance Sculpture in Kettering’s Lincoln Park Commons following a Spring Snow

The Song and Dance Sculpture was created by Barry Gunderson and installed in 2000 as part of Kettering’s CitySites art program.  The sixteen-foot tall, stainless steel characters feature outstretched arms with one touching the ground and the other arm pointing skyward.  The public art piece resides in the center of Lincoln Park Civic Commons and greets Fraze Pavilion guests as well as park visitors.
 

In late April and following the blossoming of trees throughout the Miami Valley, many awoke mid-spring to an unusual blanket of snow.  On this morning in Kettering’s Lincoln Park Civic Commons, the public art sculpture stood among snow-laden trees displaying their spring colors.
 

Kettering Ohio’s Song and Dance sculpture stands among an usual spring snow in the morning twilightKettering Song and Dance Sculpture after a Spring Snow No. 2The Song and Dance Sculpture was created by Barry Gunderson and installed in 2000 as part of Kettering’s CitySites art program. The sixteen-foot tall, stainless steel characters feature outstretched arms with one touching the ground and the other arm pointing skyward. The public art piece resides in the center of Lincoln Park Civic Commons and greets Fraze Pavilion guests as well as park visitors.

In late April and following the blossoming of trees throughout the Miami Valley, many awoke mid-spring to an unusual blanket of snow. On this morning in Kettering’s Lincoln Park Civic Commons, the public art sculpture, stood among snow-laden trees displaying their spring colors.

If you are interested in this print, just click on it.  I also have two galleries which may interest you, “Kettering Lincoln Civic Park Scenes” and “Kettering Ohio Sculptures”.  Viewers may want to see other Kettering Park scenes starting with this collection of galleries.
 


Piqua Ohio Memorials

Piqua Ohio Honors William Hart Pitsenbarger, Domenic Salvatore Gentile, and William M. McCulloch

The Midwest displays patriotism through its many small towns.  One such example lies in Piqua Ohio where they honor several local heroes through its sculptures and plaques.
 

William Hart Pitsenbarger Memorial

Airman First Class William Pitsenbarger Memorial, Piqua OH No. 2Airman First Class William Pitsenbarger Memorial, Piqua OH No. 2Within Piqua’s Veterans’ Memorial Park resides this memorial dedicated to Airman First Class William Pitsenbarger. He served in the US Air Force as a pararescueman. He was killed in the Vietnam War aiding and defending a unit of soldiers pinned down by the enemy. Our nation awarded him the Medal of Honor and Piqua remembers him as one of theirs. Piqua’s Veterans’ Memorial Park No. 1Piqua’s Veterans’ Memorial Park No. 1In 1991, the Piqua Veterans’ Memorial Committed formed to create a memorial area for local citizens. The war memorial lies at Washington Avenue and State Route 66. features a black granite memorial, flag poles and a large plaza created from dedication bricks.

After 24 years in the US Air Force, I can’t think of an air force base that did not have a building named after William Hart Pitsenbarger.  His valor in saving and defending 60 men on Vietnam’s jungle floor earned him the Air Force Cross which was later upgraded to Medal of Honor.  The name William Pitsenbarger is synonymous with the ideals of putting others first which the Air Force immortalizes on the façade of buildings throughout the country.  What I didn’t know was he was also from the Miami Valley and called Piqua Ohio home. 

I learned this fact while passing through Piqua’s Veterans’ Memorial Park on a gorgeous spring day.  In 1991, Piqua’s Veterans Memorial Committee secured funding and prominent land at the intersection of Washington Avenue and State Route 66 and then placed an eight-foot-high black granite monument honoring its citizens who served our nation.  Amongst its dedication bricks lies a separate granite memorial and an Ohio Historical Marker both honoring William H. Pitsenbarger.  Both the memorial and marker share the story of his heroic actions while recognizing his Miami County roots.  On a subsequent trip to the memorial, I met a lady from the local garden club who was attending the flowerbeds surrounding this large memorial.  In our conversation, she shared that she knew William Pitsenbarger.  In fact, she grew up across the street from Billy.  After recalling her experiences, the lady inquired if I had seen the statue of Billy at Pitsenbarger Park and Sports Complex. 

Although a sports park honoring Pitsenbarger was created years before, in 2015 and after several years of fundraising, the Friends of the Piqua Parks installed a life-size, bronze sculpture of William Pitsenbarger at the park’s entrance.  Set atop a grey granite base, the statue captures the essence of his amicable and caring personality.  As Piqua’s vice mayor shared, many of our children pass through Pitsenbarger Park and Sports Complex but now, with the large statue, they can begin to better grasp the man he was. 

Life-sized sculpture of William H. Pitsenbarger in Piqua Ohio sports park named after himA1C William H. Pitsenbarger Statue No. 1William H. Pitsenbarger was born in Piqua Ohio, became an Air Force pararescueman, and died serving his country in a heroic feat saving and defending the lives of 60 men on the jungle floor of Vietnam. This singular act led to the posthumous awards of the Air Force Cross which was later upgraded to Medal of Honor. Hollywood recently immortalized his life and sacrifice in a movie called “The Last Full Measure”. In 2015 and after several years of fundraising, the Friends of the Piqua Parks installed a life-size, bronze sculpture of William Pitsenbarger at the entrance of Pitsenbarger Park and Sports Complex. Life-sized sculpture of William H. Pitsenbarger in Piqua Ohio sports park named after himA1C William H. Pitsenbarger Statue No. 3William H. Pitsenbarger was born in Piqua Ohio, became an Air Force pararescueman, and died serving his country in a heroic feat saving and defending the lives of 60 men on the jungle floor of Vietnam. This singular act led to the posthumous awards of the Air Force Cross which was later upgraded to Medal of Honor. Hollywood recently immortalized his life and sacrifice in a movie called “The Last Full Measure”. In 2015 and after several years of fundraising, the Friends of the Piqua Parks installed a life-size, bronze sculpture of William Pitsenbarger at the entrance of Pitsenbarger Park and Sports Complex.

 

Domenic Gentile Memorial

Dominic Salvatore "Don" Gentile was born in Piqua, Ohio in 1920.  As a child, Gentile was fascinated with flight and even learned to fly while still in high school.  As war emerged over Europe and lacking the required college education for the US Army Air Corps, Gentile joined the British Royal Air Force in 1941, serving in the famous 133 Eagle Squadron.  As the US ramped up its war effort, he was assigned to the 4th Fighter Group which eventually was equipped with P-51 Mustangs.  His talents and tenacity made him Army Air Force’s leading ace with 27 kills to his credit.  Given his reputation, General Eisenhower labeled Domenic Gentile a “One Man Air Force”.  In 1986, the City of Piqua dedicated this sculpture which resides on Veterans Way near North Main Street and East High Street. 

Sculpture of Dominic Gentile, WWII Fighter Ace and local hero, as it stands in the center of Piqua OhioDomenic Gentile Memorial, Piqua OH No. 1Dominic Salvatore "Don" Gentile was born in Piqua, Ohio in 1920. As a child, Gentile was fascinated with flight and even learned to fly while still in high school. As war emerged over Europe and lacking the required college education for the US Army Air Corps, Gentile joined the British Royal Air Force in 1941, serving in the famous 133 Eagle Squadron. As the US ramped up its war effort, he was assigned to the 4th Fighter Group which eventually was equipped with P-51 Mustangs. His talents and tenacity made him Army Air Force’s leading ace with 27 kills to his credit. Given his reputation, General Eisenhower labeled Domenic Gentile a “One Man Air Force”. In 1986, the City of Piqua dedicated this sculpture which resides on Veterans Way near North Main Street and East High Street.

William M. McCulloch Memorial

William McCulloch was born in Ohio in 1901 and early in his law and political career, settled in Piqua Ohio.  In addition to practicing law, he served as a state representative and eventually speaker of the house in Columbus.  As WWII broke out, he resigned as Ohio’s Speaker of the House and enlisted in the US Army at 40 years old.  After the war, he was elected to the US Congress where he was instrumental in shaping enduring legislation such as the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and the 1968 Fair Housing Act.  William McCulloch passed on 22 February 1980 and was interred at Arlington National Cemetery.  In July 1990, the City of Piqua renamed this square in his honor and in 2018 installed this sculpture in his honor

Sculpture of William McCulloch in front of Fort Piqua Plaza, McCulloch Square, Piqua OhioMcCulloch Square Sculpture No. 1William McCulloch was born in Ohio in 1901 and early in his law and political career, settled in Piqua Ohio. In addition to practicing law, he served as a state representative and eventually speaker of the house in Columbus. As WWII broke out, he resigned as Ohio’s Speaker of the House and enlisted in the US Army at 40 years old. After the war, he was elected to the US Congress where he was instrumental in shaping enduring legislation such as the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and the 1968 Fair Housing Act. William McCulloch passed on 22 February 1980 and was interred at Arlington National Cemetery. In July 1990, the City of Piqua renamed this square in his honor. Fort Piqua displays Richardson Romanesque-style architecture with impressive stoneworkFort Piqua Plaza in Spring No. 1Fort Piqua is an impressive architectural structure displaying Richardson Romanesque-style architecture in downtown Piqua Ohio. Built in 1891, the Orr-Statler Block once contained a four-story hotel which hosted Teddy Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Harry Houdini, Woodrow Wilson and John P. Sousa. In the early 2000s, the building was revitalized and today hosts the Piqua Public Library.

Piqua, Ohio is a fascinating small town.  If you like to see more art prints of Piqua, check out this master gallery or just double click on the images.  In addition to Piqua Ohio Memorials, I offer portfolios capturing impressive Piqua Architecture, pretty Piqua Parks, and the colorful Piqua High School stadium.    

 


Wheat Field at Golden Hour No. 5

Evidence-based Design for Soothing Waiting Room Art
 

Nearly mature wheat awaits harvest as the sun’s last rays paints the field in warm golden light.Wheat Field at Golden Hour No. 5During this sunset image, varying layers of clouds create an interesting sky, while a Miami Valley wheat field stands ready for harvest as the day’s last rays paint the Ohio farm in warm golden light.

This farm field scene remains a favorite.  Sure, Ohio farmlands are commonplace, but this pretty landscape involved a field of wheat vice fields of corn, which are so commonplace in the Midwest.  During this evening image, the setting sun backlights the wheat in golden hues, creating a warm nostalgic glow.  Perhaps the viewer’s mind begins to ponder about amber waves of grain.  The scene offers intriguing contrasting light between the golden wheatfield and the dark clouds which were clearing the Miami Valley skies as sunset approached. 

 

For many, this Miami Valley sunset captures the essence of evidence-based design (EBD).  In a previous post, I discussed how researchers experimented with various settings, they learned people become the most relaxed when surrounded by nature.  As EBD becomes mainstream in hospitals and medical facilities, I’m surprised that evidence-based design wall décor principles haven’t appeared in corporate waiting rooms and hotel lobbies. 

 

A Google search of waiting room art reveals spaces where interior designers used art prints that were diligently color-coordinated with the hues of walls, carpet, and furniture.  In looking at these images closer, their use of traditional pastel prints, abstract art or minimalist artwork involving shapes of various shades misses an important opportunity.  Sure, they nailed the color coordination, but the artwork does nothing more than accentuate the color palate. 

 

Waiting room artwork is an opportunity where the companies can begin placing their clients at ease.  To this point, researchers have divided hospital floor space with one side of the hallway having rooms displaying pastel-painted floral scenes, abstract art, and other pieces appropriate for an episode of the Antiques Roadshow.  On the other side of the hallway, researchers installed scenes of nature, gardens, and other representational landscape prints.  Several studies conducted in this manner revealed the patients immersed in artwork featuring nature healed faster, required less pain medication, and were discharged quicker than those from the other side of the hallway.  As a result of these studies, hospitals have transitioned their corridors and patient rooms over to art prints which feature photographs of nature.  If this approach places patients at ease, it’s a little bewildering that many of today’s corporate waiting rooms still use outdated wall décor.

 

As a client sits in your foyer or transits your hallways, why not give them something pleasant to rest their eyes on?  Bypassing this opportunity, people will sit and dwell on the upcoming meeting. Perhaps the uncertainty of the appointment begins to weigh on them.  Researchers have already validated the abstract or painted pastel artwork isn’t effective, so why not upgrade your wall décor which employs EBD principles and reduces the stress for your visitors and clients?  The outdated subject matter, hidden behind the glare of glass, costs the same, if not more, than a vivid and representational landscape printed on canvas. 

 

The sunset scene supporting this article serves as a good example.  First, it’s a representational landscape as the viewer immediately recognizes it’s a sunset over a wheat field.  There’s no abstract uncertainty involved in view this print, no trying to interpret what the painter meant to portray.  Who wants to introduce uncertainty in your client’s mind in the moments before they see you?  This scene also employs an EBD principle of long horizons and sightlines which researchers already know reduces stress.  Researchers have pondered the stress reduction might be an innate trait from eons ago when humans first emerged on the African savannahs and our ancestors were part of the food chain, thus the long sightlines provided for enhanced safety and security from threats.  Also, there is something magical about looking into light, particularly backlit vegetation where the contrasting light becomes a form of eye candy.  Finally, if the scene employs a local park or iconic point of interest, you have the added benefit of your wall décor now becoming a visitor talking point where they reminiscence about a memory or recent visit to the feature  Given all these benefits, its puzzling that so many of today’s waiting room still employ grandma’s pastel-painted gazebo or abstract square and circles linked to your interior designer’s color palette when your wall décor can be doing so much more for you.

 


Yavapai Vista Point Evening Panorama No. 1

Sedona Evening from Yavapai Vista Point

An evening panorama print from Yavapai Vista Point, Sedona, where warm light washes over Red Rock Country.  In this sweeping image, the reddish Schnebly Hill Formation and light-colored Coconino Sandstone of Twin Buttes, Munds Mountain, Courthouse Butte, and Bell Rock (left to right) form a pleasing complementary contrast with the blue azure Arizona skies. 
 

A panorama from Yavapai Vista Point, Sedona as evening light washes over Twin Butte, Munds Mountain, Courthouse Butte and Bell RockYavapai Vista Point Evening Panorama No. 1An evening panorama print from Yavapai Vista Point, Sedona, where warm light washes over Red Rock Country. In this sweeping image, the reddish Schnebly Hill Formation and light-colored Coconino Sandstone of Twin Buttes, Munds Mountain, Courthouse Butte, and Bell Rock (left to right) form a pleasing complementary contrast with the blue azure Arizona skies.   If you'd like to purchase this print, just click on it.  If you'd like to see more art prints featuring Sedona wall decor, check out this Sedona Gallery.  


Cedar Cliff Falls in Spring No. 9

A Peaceful Cedarville Ohio Waterfall

Cedar Cliff Falls flows outside the quaint village of Cedarville Ohio.  A recent boardwalk construction project by the Greene County Parks & Trails allows visitors to safely view the falls from the edge of the gorge formed by Massie Creek.  On this spring day, the creek spills over the falls while surrounding lush trees pleasantly frame the scene.
 

Cedar Cliff Falls as seen from a bridge spanning Massie Creek gorge where a long exposure gives the water a smooth appearanceCedar Cliff Falls in Spring No. 9Cedarville, Ohio hosts Cedarville University which is a Christian Undergraduate school. Its also a pretty campus which supports several iconic building, sculptures and Cedar Lake which lies in the middle of campus. Adjacent to the village lies a host of Greene County Ohio parks to include: Peterson Park, Indian Mound Reserve, Cedar Falls, and Massie Creek Park. These images form canvas prints which serve as perfect mementos to Cedarville University graduates and those seeking Green County Ohio artwork.

This gallery holds my Cedarville Fine Art Photography art prints which capture Greene County Ohio parks particularly Cedar Cliff Falls. Where most waterfalls are heavily shaded, Cedar Cliff Falls in the spring is surrounded by gorgeous wildflowers. Long exposures of the waterfall as Massie’s Creek spills into the gorge below creates timeless art prints which make for vivid canvas wall décor.

This gallery also captures Cedarville University’s pretty campus which is adorned with several sculptures like Synchronicity X (by Jon Hudson Barlow) and Opened Eyes (by Dr. James DeVries). In addition to these Cedarville Ohio points of interest, the campus groundskeepers do an amazing job as sidewalks and pathways meander by vibrant and colorful gardens.

Some of my best photography arises from Cedarville Ohio so if you are seeking a Cedarville University graduation gift, consider a framed print from one of Cedarville’s landmarks.

If you’d like to purchase this print, just click on it.  For more images like this, check out my Cedarville Ohio art prints or my waterfalls gallery.

 

 


Sugarcreek Sunflower Sunset

Local Bellbrook Sunflower Field at Sunset

Within Sugarcreek Township and south of Bellbrook, Ohio, resides a local family who graciously opens their five-generation farm every year called the Lucas Brothers Fall Fest.  It’s the classic Ohio experience involving fields of pumpkins, hayrides, corn maze, and this amazing field of sunflowers.  In this blue hour scene, the sunflowers form a complementary color contrast with the blue skies of the on-coming twilight.
 

A sunflower field at twilight where a gentle camera flash warmly illuminated the flowers that contrast with the blues of the oncoming twilight skiesSugarcreek Sunflower Sunset No. 3Within Sugarcreek Township and south of Bellbrook, Ohio, resides a local family who graciously opens their five-generation farm every year called the Lucas Brothers Fall Fest. It’s the classic Ohio experience involving fields of pumpkins, hayrides, corn maze, and this amazing field of sunflowers. In this blue hour scene, the sunflowers illuminated by a gentle flash form a complementary color contrast with the blue skies of the on-coming twilight.

If you’d like to purchase this print click on it.  For more prints from Sugarcreek Township, check out these Bellbrook Ohio art prints.  If fields of sunflowers is more to your liking, you might want to check out this Sunflower Gallery.  

A sunflower field at twilight where a gentle camera flash warmly illuminated the flowers that contrast with the blues of the oncoming twilight skiesSugarcreek Sunflower Sunset No. 1Within Sugarcreek Township and south of Bellbrook, Ohio, resides a local family who graciously opens their five-generation farm every year called the Lucas Brothers Fall Fest.  It’s the classic Ohio experience involving fields of pumpkins, hayrides, corn maze, and this amazing field of sunflowers.  In this blue hour scene, the sunflowers form a complementary color contrast with the blue skies of the on-coming twilight.